thrust-weight/thrust/weight ratio

The ratio of the maximum sea-level static installed thrust to aircraft weight. It is one of the combat performance attributes that gives an idea of the maneuverability of a combat aircraft. This ratio is generally greater than one in air-superiority fighters, which permits them to climb vertically and still accelerate. However, in other aircraft, this ratio is less than one. The higher the ratio, the higher is the rate of climb, acceleration, and maneuverability. In engines, it is the ratio of the thrust output to the engine weight less fuel.

Aviation dictionary. 2014.

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